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Climbing Huashan (华山), China’s Most Heart-stopping Hike

For more photos from the hike to the top, explore the  华山 Mount Huashan location page and browse the #huashan and #华山 hashtags.

In China’s Shaanxi province, 120 kilometers (75 miles) west of Xi’an, the peaks of Mount Hua, or Huashan (华山), pierce the clouds, tempting adventurers to explore their heights.

The westernmost of China’s legendary Five Great Mountains, Huashan has stood as a destination for Daoist and Buddhist pilgramage for centuries—though the inaccessability of its peaks attracts only the most dedicated of pilgrims.

The southern peak reaches the highest altitude at 2,155 meters (7,070 feet), igniting the imaginations of thrill-seeking travellers. Home to an ancient monastery that in recent years has been converted into a tea house, the trail to the peak is one of the most dangerous in the world. Those brave enough to make the climb face steep and winding staircases carved into the cliffs and Huashan’s notorious plank road: a series of wooden planks affixed to the mountain’s face with no rails or barracades between hikers and the abyss below.
instagram:

Climbing Huashan (华山), China’s Most Heart-stopping Hike

For more photos from the hike to the top, explore the  华山 Mount Huashan location page and browse the #huashan and #华山 hashtags.

In China’s Shaanxi province, 120 kilometers (75 miles) west of Xi’an, the peaks of Mount Hua, or Huashan (华山), pierce the clouds, tempting adventurers to explore their heights.

The westernmost of China’s legendary Five Great Mountains, Huashan has stood as a destination for Daoist and Buddhist pilgramage for centuries—though the inaccessability of its peaks attracts only the most dedicated of pilgrims.

The southern peak reaches the highest altitude at 2,155 meters (7,070 feet), igniting the imaginations of thrill-seeking travellers. Home to an ancient monastery that in recent years has been converted into a tea house, the trail to the peak is one of the most dangerous in the world. Those brave enough to make the climb face steep and winding staircases carved into the cliffs and Huashan’s notorious plank road: a series of wooden planks affixed to the mountain’s face with no rails or barracades between hikers and the abyss below.
instagram:

Climbing Huashan (华山), China’s Most Heart-stopping Hike

For more photos from the hike to the top, explore the  华山 Mount Huashan location page and browse the #huashan and #华山 hashtags.

In China’s Shaanxi province, 120 kilometers (75 miles) west of Xi’an, the peaks of Mount Hua, or Huashan (华山), pierce the clouds, tempting adventurers to explore their heights.

The westernmost of China’s legendary Five Great Mountains, Huashan has stood as a destination for Daoist and Buddhist pilgramage for centuries—though the inaccessability of its peaks attracts only the most dedicated of pilgrims.

The southern peak reaches the highest altitude at 2,155 meters (7,070 feet), igniting the imaginations of thrill-seeking travellers. Home to an ancient monastery that in recent years has been converted into a tea house, the trail to the peak is one of the most dangerous in the world. Those brave enough to make the climb face steep and winding staircases carved into the cliffs and Huashan’s notorious plank road: a series of wooden planks affixed to the mountain’s face with no rails or barracades between hikers and the abyss below.
instagram:

Climbing Huashan (华山), China’s Most Heart-stopping Hike

For more photos from the hike to the top, explore the  华山 Mount Huashan location page and browse the #huashan and #华山 hashtags.

In China’s Shaanxi province, 120 kilometers (75 miles) west of Xi’an, the peaks of Mount Hua, or Huashan (华山), pierce the clouds, tempting adventurers to explore their heights.

The westernmost of China’s legendary Five Great Mountains, Huashan has stood as a destination for Daoist and Buddhist pilgramage for centuries—though the inaccessability of its peaks attracts only the most dedicated of pilgrims.

The southern peak reaches the highest altitude at 2,155 meters (7,070 feet), igniting the imaginations of thrill-seeking travellers. Home to an ancient monastery that in recent years has been converted into a tea house, the trail to the peak is one of the most dangerous in the world. Those brave enough to make the climb face steep and winding staircases carved into the cliffs and Huashan’s notorious plank road: a series of wooden planks affixed to the mountain’s face with no rails or barracades between hikers and the abyss below.
instagram:

Climbing Huashan (华山), China’s Most Heart-stopping Hike

For more photos from the hike to the top, explore the  华山 Mount Huashan location page and browse the #huashan and #华山 hashtags.

In China’s Shaanxi province, 120 kilometers (75 miles) west of Xi’an, the peaks of Mount Hua, or Huashan (华山), pierce the clouds, tempting adventurers to explore their heights.

The westernmost of China’s legendary Five Great Mountains, Huashan has stood as a destination for Daoist and Buddhist pilgramage for centuries—though the inaccessability of its peaks attracts only the most dedicated of pilgrims.

The southern peak reaches the highest altitude at 2,155 meters (7,070 feet), igniting the imaginations of thrill-seeking travellers. Home to an ancient monastery that in recent years has been converted into a tea house, the trail to the peak is one of the most dangerous in the world. Those brave enough to make the climb face steep and winding staircases carved into the cliffs and Huashan’s notorious plank road: a series of wooden planks affixed to the mountain’s face with no rails or barracades between hikers and the abyss below.
instagram:

Climbing Huashan (华山), China’s Most Heart-stopping Hike

For more photos from the hike to the top, explore the  华山 Mount Huashan location page and browse the #huashan and #华山 hashtags.

In China’s Shaanxi province, 120 kilometers (75 miles) west of Xi’an, the peaks of Mount Hua, or Huashan (华山), pierce the clouds, tempting adventurers to explore their heights.

The westernmost of China’s legendary Five Great Mountains, Huashan has stood as a destination for Daoist and Buddhist pilgramage for centuries—though the inaccessability of its peaks attracts only the most dedicated of pilgrims.

The southern peak reaches the highest altitude at 2,155 meters (7,070 feet), igniting the imaginations of thrill-seeking travellers. Home to an ancient monastery that in recent years has been converted into a tea house, the trail to the peak is one of the most dangerous in the world. Those brave enough to make the climb face steep and winding staircases carved into the cliffs and Huashan’s notorious plank road: a series of wooden planks affixed to the mountain’s face with no rails or barracades between hikers and the abyss below.
instagram:

Climbing Huashan (华山), China’s Most Heart-stopping Hike

For more photos from the hike to the top, explore the  华山 Mount Huashan location page and browse the #huashan and #华山 hashtags.

In China’s Shaanxi province, 120 kilometers (75 miles) west of Xi’an, the peaks of Mount Hua, or Huashan (华山), pierce the clouds, tempting adventurers to explore their heights.

The westernmost of China’s legendary Five Great Mountains, Huashan has stood as a destination for Daoist and Buddhist pilgramage for centuries—though the inaccessability of its peaks attracts only the most dedicated of pilgrims.

The southern peak reaches the highest altitude at 2,155 meters (7,070 feet), igniting the imaginations of thrill-seeking travellers. Home to an ancient monastery that in recent years has been converted into a tea house, the trail to the peak is one of the most dangerous in the world. Those brave enough to make the climb face steep and winding staircases carved into the cliffs and Huashan’s notorious plank road: a series of wooden planks affixed to the mountain’s face with no rails or barracades between hikers and the abyss below.

instagram:

Climbing Huashan (华山), China’s Most Heart-stopping Hike

For more photos from the hike to the top, explore the 华山 Mount Huashan location page and browse the #huashan and #华山 hashtags.

In China’s Shaanxi province, 120 kilometers (75 miles) west of Xi’an, the peaks of Mount Hua, or Huashan (华山), pierce the clouds, tempting adventurers to explore their heights.

The westernmost of China’s legendary Five Great Mountains, Huashan has stood as a destination for Daoist and Buddhist pilgramage for centuries—though the inaccessability of its peaks attracts only the most dedicated of pilgrims.

The southern peak reaches the highest altitude at 2,155 meters (7,070 feet), igniting the imaginations of thrill-seeking travellers. Home to an ancient monastery that in recent years has been converted into a tea house, the trail to the peak is one of the most dangerous in the world. Those brave enough to make the climb face steep and winding staircases carved into the cliffs and Huashan’s notorious plank road: a series of wooden planks affixed to the mountain’s face with no rails or barracades between hikers and the abyss below.

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Above the Clouds at Nepal’s Tengboche Monastery
To see more photos and videos from the site in the Himalayas, explore the Tengboche Monastery location page.
3,867 meters (12,687 feet) above sea level and at the foot of the Himalayas stands Tengboche Monastery.
Built in 1916, the monastery sits in the Khumbu Valley of Sagarmatha National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It’s the final stop on the “Sacred Sites Trail Project,” a circular trail of 10 monasteries in Sagamatha that draws thousands of adventurous travelers from across the globe each year.
"The surrounding mountains are incredibly rugged monoliths of dark gray and white," says Jessica DiCarlo (@jessicadicarlo), one such adventurer who shared several photos on Instagram during her visit to Tengboche in November. “It really set the tone for the rest of my trek through the Himalayas.” In the end, she says, “it ended up being one of my favorite places on the Sacred Sites circuit. Sunny, freezing, gorgeous and with a lovely community of monks.”
instagram:


Above the Clouds at Nepal’s Tengboche Monastery
To see more photos and videos from the site in the Himalayas, explore the Tengboche Monastery location page.
3,867 meters (12,687 feet) above sea level and at the foot of the Himalayas stands Tengboche Monastery.
Built in 1916, the monastery sits in the Khumbu Valley of Sagarmatha National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It’s the final stop on the “Sacred Sites Trail Project,” a circular trail of 10 monasteries in Sagamatha that draws thousands of adventurous travelers from across the globe each year.
"The surrounding mountains are incredibly rugged monoliths of dark gray and white," says Jessica DiCarlo (@jessicadicarlo), one such adventurer who shared several photos on Instagram during her visit to Tengboche in November. “It really set the tone for the rest of my trek through the Himalayas.” In the end, she says, “it ended up being one of my favorite places on the Sacred Sites circuit. Sunny, freezing, gorgeous and with a lovely community of monks.”
instagram:


Above the Clouds at Nepal’s Tengboche Monastery
To see more photos and videos from the site in the Himalayas, explore the Tengboche Monastery location page.
3,867 meters (12,687 feet) above sea level and at the foot of the Himalayas stands Tengboche Monastery.
Built in 1916, the monastery sits in the Khumbu Valley of Sagarmatha National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It’s the final stop on the “Sacred Sites Trail Project,” a circular trail of 10 monasteries in Sagamatha that draws thousands of adventurous travelers from across the globe each year.
"The surrounding mountains are incredibly rugged monoliths of dark gray and white," says Jessica DiCarlo (@jessicadicarlo), one such adventurer who shared several photos on Instagram during her visit to Tengboche in November. “It really set the tone for the rest of my trek through the Himalayas.” In the end, she says, “it ended up being one of my favorite places on the Sacred Sites circuit. Sunny, freezing, gorgeous and with a lovely community of monks.”
instagram:


Above the Clouds at Nepal’s Tengboche Monastery
To see more photos and videos from the site in the Himalayas, explore the Tengboche Monastery location page.
3,867 meters (12,687 feet) above sea level and at the foot of the Himalayas stands Tengboche Monastery.
Built in 1916, the monastery sits in the Khumbu Valley of Sagarmatha National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It’s the final stop on the “Sacred Sites Trail Project,” a circular trail of 10 monasteries in Sagamatha that draws thousands of adventurous travelers from across the globe each year.
"The surrounding mountains are incredibly rugged monoliths of dark gray and white," says Jessica DiCarlo (@jessicadicarlo), one such adventurer who shared several photos on Instagram during her visit to Tengboche in November. “It really set the tone for the rest of my trek through the Himalayas.” In the end, she says, “it ended up being one of my favorite places on the Sacred Sites circuit. Sunny, freezing, gorgeous and with a lovely community of monks.”
instagram:


Above the Clouds at Nepal’s Tengboche Monastery
To see more photos and videos from the site in the Himalayas, explore the Tengboche Monastery location page.
3,867 meters (12,687 feet) above sea level and at the foot of the Himalayas stands Tengboche Monastery.
Built in 1916, the monastery sits in the Khumbu Valley of Sagarmatha National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It’s the final stop on the “Sacred Sites Trail Project,” a circular trail of 10 monasteries in Sagamatha that draws thousands of adventurous travelers from across the globe each year.
"The surrounding mountains are incredibly rugged monoliths of dark gray and white," says Jessica DiCarlo (@jessicadicarlo), one such adventurer who shared several photos on Instagram during her visit to Tengboche in November. “It really set the tone for the rest of my trek through the Himalayas.” In the end, she says, “it ended up being one of my favorite places on the Sacred Sites circuit. Sunny, freezing, gorgeous and with a lovely community of monks.”
instagram:


Above the Clouds at Nepal’s Tengboche Monastery
To see more photos and videos from the site in the Himalayas, explore the Tengboche Monastery location page.
3,867 meters (12,687 feet) above sea level and at the foot of the Himalayas stands Tengboche Monastery.
Built in 1916, the monastery sits in the Khumbu Valley of Sagarmatha National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It’s the final stop on the “Sacred Sites Trail Project,” a circular trail of 10 monasteries in Sagamatha that draws thousands of adventurous travelers from across the globe each year.
"The surrounding mountains are incredibly rugged monoliths of dark gray and white," says Jessica DiCarlo (@jessicadicarlo), one such adventurer who shared several photos on Instagram during her visit to Tengboche in November. “It really set the tone for the rest of my trek through the Himalayas.” In the end, she says, “it ended up being one of my favorite places on the Sacred Sites circuit. Sunny, freezing, gorgeous and with a lovely community of monks.”
instagram:


Above the Clouds at Nepal’s Tengboche Monastery
To see more photos and videos from the site in the Himalayas, explore the Tengboche Monastery location page.
3,867 meters (12,687 feet) above sea level and at the foot of the Himalayas stands Tengboche Monastery.
Built in 1916, the monastery sits in the Khumbu Valley of Sagarmatha National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It’s the final stop on the “Sacred Sites Trail Project,” a circular trail of 10 monasteries in Sagamatha that draws thousands of adventurous travelers from across the globe each year.
"The surrounding mountains are incredibly rugged monoliths of dark gray and white," says Jessica DiCarlo (@jessicadicarlo), one such adventurer who shared several photos on Instagram during her visit to Tengboche in November. “It really set the tone for the rest of my trek through the Himalayas.” In the end, she says, “it ended up being one of my favorite places on the Sacred Sites circuit. Sunny, freezing, gorgeous and with a lovely community of monks.”

instagram:

Above the Clouds at Nepal’s Tengboche Monastery

To see more photos and videos from the site in the Himalayas, explore the Tengboche Monastery location page.

3,867 meters (12,687 feet) above sea level and at the foot of the Himalayas stands Tengboche Monastery.

Built in 1916, the monastery sits in the Khumbu Valley of Sagarmatha National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It’s the final stop on the “Sacred Sites Trail Project,” a circular trail of 10 monasteries in Sagamatha that draws thousands of adventurous travelers from across the globe each year.

"The surrounding mountains are incredibly rugged monoliths of dark gray and white," says Jessica DiCarlo (@jessicadicarlo), one such adventurer who shared several photos on Instagram during her visit to Tengboche in November. “It really set the tone for the rest of my trek through the Himalayas.” In the end, she says, “it ended up being one of my favorite places on the Sacred Sites circuit. Sunny, freezing, gorgeous and with a lovely community of monks.”

Everything in the world is an illusion.

The ultimate truth one has to realize is that we actually need nothing. Because to possess an illusion is as good as possessing nothing.

Amish from The secret of the Nagas

I am Sea!

I’m sea!
Flowing boundless and free!!

Letting the life be flourished,
And the creatures inside me get nourished!!

My waves live with soaring energies!
But inside of me there is an abyss!

Where live the darkest fears of mine!
It in fact is devil’s shrine!!

There lives no thing bright!
And it goes deep to infinite!!

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